Exergonic Vs Endergonic: What’s The Difference?

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t have a clear understanding of the terms exergonic and Endergonic. In this article, we’ll explore what each term means, and explain the differences between them. By the end, you should be able to understand why they’re important when it comes to energy transformations in physical systems.

What is an exergonic reaction?

Energetic processes in nature are usually exergonic, which means they produce energy as they happen. An example is the combustion of gasoline in a car engine. The energy in the gasoline is used to turn the crank and propel the car forward.

Energetic processes that are not exergonic are called endergonic. An example is photosynthesis, in which plant cells use light energy to convert carbon dioxide into glucose.

What is an endergonic reaction?

An exergonic reaction is a chemical reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. Conversely, an endergonic reaction is a chemical reaction that does not release energy in the form of heat.

Examples of endergonic reactions include the breaking down of organic compounds into molecules of hydrogen and carbon, the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen gas, and the photosynthesis of plants.

How do exergonic and endergonic reactions work?

There are two different types of reactions: exergonic and endergonic. What’s the difference? Here’s a quick refresher:

Exergonic reactions are those that occur when energy is released from a molecule or atom. For example, when sugar is burned on your kitchen stove, the energy released from the sugar molecules is an exergonic reaction. This type of reaction releases heat, light, water vapor, and carbon dioxide.

Endergonic reactions are those that require energy to happen. For example, when you put your hand in a hot oven, the temperature inside will increase because of an endergonic reaction. This type of reaction requires oxygen to happen so it can release heat and water vapor.

Which reactions are exergonic and which are endergonic?

The two reactions are exergonic and endergonic depending on their energy. An exergonic reaction is one that releases energy while an endergonic reaction is one that uses energy. Here’s a quick rundown of the difference:

Exergonic reactions happen spontaneously and release energy, while endergonic reactions require the input of energy to happen. For example, combustion is an exergonic reaction while respiration is an endergonic reaction.

Here are some more examples of exergonic and endergonic reactions:

Exergonictic: voila! – spontaneous release of gas from a can of paint

Energonictic: heaving a weight – requires energy (usually exerted by muscle) to move

Endergonic: breathing – requires oxygen to happen 

Exergonic reactions are the ones that release energy, while endergonic reactions are the ones that require energy to happen.

Here are some more examples of exergonic and endergonic reactions:

Exergonictic: voila! – spontaneous release of gas from a can of paint

Energonictic: heaving a weight – requires energy (usually exerted by muscle) to move

Exergonic reactions are always good for releasing energy, while endergonic reactions need the energy to happen.

Examples of exergonic and endergonic reactions

The two main types of reactions are exergonic and endergonic. These reactions are determined by whether the atoms or molecules involved in the reaction gain or lose energy.

An example of an exergonic reaction is when oxygen combines with hydrogen to create water. This reaction is driven by energy released from the hydrogen atoms. Conversely, an example of an endergonic reaction is when methane gas is combined with oxygen to create carbon dioxide. This reaction is not driven by any energy released, but instead by the heat of the interaction between the gases.

The difference between photosynthesis and respiration

Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy turns carbon dioxide into glucose. Respiration is the process by which an organism breaks down food to extract energy for use.

When it comes to our energy consumption, we typically think about exergonic and endergonic processes.

Here’s a quick rundown of the two:

-Exergonic processes occur when something is destroyed or converted into heat or work. This could be as simple as turning on a light switch or as complex as cooking a meal.
-Endergonic processes occur when something is created or used. This could be as simple as typing on a keyboard or as complex as solving a math problem.

The main difference between the two is that exergonic processes are spontaneous and endergonic ones are not. Spontaneous means that they happen without any outside stimulus, while an outside stimulus is needed for an endergonic process. For example, you may need to cook food in order to create energy, but turning on a light switch does not require any external input.

Summary

What are an exergonic reaction and an endergonic reaction? In chemistry, exergonic reactions are those that occur due to the gain of energy, while endergonic reactions are those that occur due to the loss of energy.

The two types of reactions can be distinguished by whether the energy comes from the surroundings or from the reactants themselves. Endergonic reactions involve a loss of energy, while exergonic reactions involve a gain of energy.

The most common example of an endergonic reaction is the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen: The hydrogen gas is released as a result of the loss of energy during this process, while the oxygen gas is created as a result of the gain in energy.

Exergonic reactions are more common than endergonic reactions, but there are exceptions to this rule. For example, the activation of carbon dioxide by sunlight is an endergonic process, but it’s also an important step in photosynthesis.