Condyle Vs Epicondyle: What’s the Difference?

The condyle and epicondyle are two of the most common bone structures in the human body. Both of these bones play an important role in your overall health, so it’s important to be aware of their differences if you’re looking for information on them. In this article, we’ll explore the anatomy and function of each bone, and tell you everything you need to know about them in order to make an informed decision about which one is right for you.

Anatomy of the Knee

Condyle vs Epicondyle: What’s the Difference?

Condyles are the round, fatty protrusions on the underside of the kneecap. They are located on the outside of the knee cap, just above the joint. Condyles can be found on both men and women.

Epicondyles are located on the inside of the knee cap, just below the joint. They are smaller in size than condyles, and they are more common in men than women.

Types of Knees

Condyle vs Epicondyle: What’s the Difference?

Most people are familiar with the terms condyle and epicondyle, but what are they and what’s the difference? The condyles are on the inside of the knee while the epicondyles are on the outside. Here’s a more detailed explanation:

The condyles are located on the inside of the knee joint and are made up of cartilage. The epicondyles, on the other hand, are located on the outside of the knee joint and are made up of bone. This difference is why they’re often referred to as “condylar” and “epicondylar” knees.

Condyle vs Epicondyle: What’s the Difference?

Condyle vs Epicondyle: What’s the Difference?

The condyle is the larger of the two bones that make up the elbow joint. It’s located on the upper arm bone and it has a rounded shape. The epicondyle, on the other hand, is the smaller of the two bones and it has a more pointed shape.

The function of condyle and epicondyle

Condyle: The condyle is the larger of the two cartilages that make up the shoulder joint. It sits on top of the epicondyle, which is located beneath it. Together, they form the shoulder joint.

The function of the condyle is to provide stability to the shoulder joint and allow for smooth movement. The epicondyle helps with this by providing a surface on which the rotator cuff muscles can attach.

Injuries to the condyle can lead to shoulder pain and instability, while injuries to the epicondyle can often go undiagnosed and result in less severe symptoms.

Difference between condyle and epicondyle

Condyle vs. Epicondyle: What’s the Difference?

The condyle is the larger, more prominent bone on the end of your humerus (upper arm bone), while the epicondyle is the smaller, thinner bone on the same end. The difference between these two bones is significant enough that some experts refer to them separately as “condylar” and “epicondylar.” While both bones are important for joint health, their respective functions will vary depending on where they’re located on your arm.

The condylar bone is mainly responsible for rotating your arm and shoulder joint, while the epicondylar helps to transmit weight from your arm to your shoulder. If you have a pinched or injured epicondyle, it can cause pain in your shoulder and limit your ability to rotate your arm fully.

So what’s the big deal? Well, if you suffer from any type of shoulder pain or limited range of motion, it’s important to get checked out by a doctor. In many cases, correcting an injury to the epicondyle can restore function and relieve pain in the shoulder area.

How to know if you have a condyle or an epicondyle fracture

Condyle fractures are more common than epicondyle fractures, but there is still some confusion about the difference between the two. Here’s how to tell the difference:

1. If you have a condyle fracture, the bone around it is depressed or flattened.
2. If you have an epicondyle fracture, the bone around it is not depressed or flattened.

Treatment for condyle vs epicondyle fracture

A condyle fracture is a break of the humerus bone in the upper arm. Epicondyle fracture is a break of the humerus bone in the lower arm.
Both fractures can be treated with surgery, but each has different risks and benefits.

Condyle fractures are more common than epicondyle fractures, but both can be serious injuries. They occur more often in people over the age of 50, and are more likely to cause pain and disability.

Epicondyle fractures are less common than condyle fractures, but they are also more serious. They can cause significant disability if not treated quickly, and they occur more often in athletes and people who do heavy lifting.

There are several factors that can influence which fracture is more severe: age, weight, height, gender, genetics, and medical history. Treatment for condyle vs epicondyle fracture will vary depending on these factors.

Conclusion

If you’ve ever had a pain in your elbow, you’re probably familiar with the terms condyle and epicondyle. These are two of the four bones that make up the elbow joint, and they both play a role in how your arm moves. The condyles sit on top of the epicondyles, which is where the tendon for flexion (moving your hand up) attaches. The tendon for extension (moving your hand down) attaches to the epicondyle on the other side.