Askant Vs Askance: What’s The Difference?

There are plenty of English words that can be used in both positive and negative ways. In this article, we’ll explore the difference between Askant and Askance, two words that are used in a similar way but have different meanings.

Askant

What is the difference between askant and askance?

Askant is a word that means “appearing eager” while askance means “looking at someone with suspicion or dislike.” The two words have different meanings, but they both have to do with how someone looks.

Askant is used to describe someone who appears eager. For example, if you say that a person looks askant, you are referring to their appearance and not their behavior or words.

Askance is used to describe someone who looks at someone with suspicion or dislike. For example, if you say that a person looks askance at you, you are referring to their look and not anything else they may have said or done.

If you want to say that someone is looking at something with interest, you can use the word gaze. Gaze is a more general word that can be used in both positive and negative ways, but it has a different meaning than askant and askance.

Askance

Askance is a word used to describe someone or something who looks displeased or disgruntled. Askant is a word that is used to describe someone or something who looks happy and content.

The Difference Between Askance and Askant:

If you are looking for a word to describe someone or something who looks displeased or disgruntled, then you would use the word askance. If you are looking for a word to describe someone or something who looks happy and content, then you would use the word askance.

Summary:

Askant means “appearing eager” while askance means “looking at someone with suspicion or dislike.”

Askant vs Askance: Usage

Askant is a word that means “approachable” or “friendly.” Askance, on the other hand, is a word that means “skeptical,” “reserved,” or “indifferent.”

It is used more frequently in British English, whereas askant is more common in American English.

Both words can be used to describe someone’s demeanor, but askance is often used to describe someone’s attitude or appearance. For example, in the sentence “He looked askance at the gift,” the speaker is looking at the gift skeptically and may not appreciate it.

 

Askant vs Askance: Origins

Askant has its origins in the Anglo-Norman “askier” and “askeir” from the Old French “associer”, meaning “to associate”.

It came to be used as a formal suffix for words meaning “looking askance, suspiciously”.

Askeir has its origins in the Old Norse “askr”, meaning “look”.

It came to be used as a formal suffix for words meaning “appearance, aspect”.

Askant vs Askance: Etymology

Askant, from Old French asking, is a noun meaning “a dullard” or “a simpleton.” The adjective form, askance, means “gazing with suspicion or hostility.” The word likely originated in the 14th century when it meant “dumbfounded by astonishment or ignorance.” Askance came to be used chiefly in the expression ask an ass to carry a load (meaning to be exceedingly foolish).

Askant vs Askance: The Difference

There is a small but important difference between askant and askance. They both mean “to regard with suspicion,” but askant is less formal and suggests a more casual attitude. Askance, on the other hand, is more formal and suggests an attitude of disapproval or hostility.

Here are some examples of how these two words can be used:

I asked him if he wanted to come to the party, but I got the feeling he was askant about it.

I was asked to speak at the conference, but I got the feeling that others there were askance about my presence.

Conclusion

Askant and askance are two words that can be difficult to differentiate. The main difference between the two is that askant is a word that is used when talking about objects or people, while askance is used when talking about angles or positions.

For example, in the sentence “The car was parked askant,” “parked” is being used as a verb, meaning it’s acting as an action word. In the sentence “The car was parked askantly,” “parked” is being used as an adjective, describing the noun “car” in terms of its position.